Cahiers

1994 / n° 5

Charles Fourier, philosophies

sommaire
résumés
abstracts
commander





Présentation

Louis Ucciani
Présentation

Etudes

Louis Ucciani
The Principle of Dispersion

The introduction to Le Nouveau Monde amoureux is, in many respects, an exposition of the conditions in which the expression of multiplicity becomes possible. Such expression would originate in the acceptance of the other as my own same, not in what brings us together as members of the same group but in what separates us. It is by cultivating this common difference, that I might reintegrate the species. There lays the paradoxical proposal put forward by Fourier : reunion in dispersion.

résumé | abstract

Claude Morilhat
Charles Fourier, God, and Religion

Some do not hesitate to describe Fourier as a religious, and sometimes Christian, thinker. But beyond the encroaching religious rhetoric, it appears that providentialism is only an axiom which logic renders necessary for the Theory of passionate attraction, the latter undermining the established religion. As to the Harmonian religion, it boils down to the exaltation of a new social order. For Fourier, religion is merely a benevolent illusion.

résumé | abstract

Laura Tundo
The Free Development

Or how Fourier substitutes to the traditional morality based on the repression of desires an ethic based on the profusion and on the free development of passions. The point is to reevaluate desires and passions, to see their positive dimension whereas civilization sees them negatively. With such a transvaluation, Fourier anticipated the theories of Freud and Marcuse ; it constitutes one 0f the essential moments of his revolutionary thinking.

résumé | abstract

Michèle Madonna-Desbazeille
De l’Apocalypse à la Genèse : le Même transfiguré

The end of Le Nouveau Monde amoureux is an apocalyptic performance : a presentation and representation of a new world. Fourier plays the role of the angel-prophet-mediator between Man and the Divine ; he brings to light a truth hidden for too long : Man can displace an replace the stars. The Time has come.

résumé | abstract

Laurence Bouchet
Au hasard des rues...
Breton à la rencontre de Fourier

The discovery of Fourier by Breton owes nothing to erudite curiosity ; it is truly an encounter in the heart of the city, a place of passage where utopia looms large. Fourier seems to guide Breton via a woman’s hand ; he points to the feasibility of a new social order, whose keys would be the poetry, the analogy, and the exaltation of desire. Contrary to some disciples, Breton approaches Fourier’s writings in their entirety, and one may wonder whether the surrealist group was not, in its own terms, one of the most faithful and beautiful embodiments of the phalanstery.

résumé | abstract

Urias Arantes
Et l’idée organise le monde
Notes sur les fouriéristes dissidents

This paper discusses some traits shared by the various groups of dissenters in the Fourierist movement, underlining their relationship with the Parisian group leaded by V. Considerant. The central idea is that it existed a difficulty for both the orthodox and the dissenters regarding the blind spot in the Master’s thinking.

résumé | abstract

Maria Alberta Sarti
Fourier and Zola

We can find in Zola’s preparatory notebooks of his Quatre Évangiles a series of reading notes, together with some general reflections bearing witness to his awakening interest for politics. Much place is devoted to Fourier, whose theories definitely inform Zola’s fiction.

résumé | abstract

Jean-Claude Dubos
La presse parisienne et Charles Fourier

Bibliographie fouriériste : travaux en langue espagnole

Notes de lecture

Maria Alberta Sarti
UCCIANI Louis : Ironie et dérision (1993)

Louis Ucciani
SCHERER René : Zeus hospitalier (1993)

Louis Ucciani
HENRIC Jacques : Adorations perpétuelles (1994)

Michel Cordillot
CARON Jean-Claude : La France de 1815 à 1848 (1993)

Jean-Claude Dubos
VERNUS Michel : Victor Considerant (1808-1893), le coeur et la raison (1993)

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