retour au sommaire

Some notes on the usefulness of biographical research for the study of the Fourierist movement

Marc Vuilleumier  |  2012 / n° 23 |  octobre 2016



Abstract

After showing the difficulty encountered in identifying the phalansterians and in writing their biography when they are not well-known figures, the author suggests some possible venues of research, starting from an event, a place, or various pieces of writing. He highlights the obstacles related to the use of the the societarian archives and the exceptional interest of La Démocratie pacifique, stressing its original character and the resources it offers. As a example, he proposes biographical sketches of three persons : one, Alexandre Weil, who has already been the object of a book-length biography that leaves however aside many points pertaining to his fourierist period ; the second, Édouard de Pompéry, an original figure who remained true to his convictions throughout his entire life ; the third one, Henry Dameth, who joined spontaneously the societarian school, did a lot of propaganda in its favor, but abandoned his convictions and switched to orthodox liberalism after 1848.

Read this article

Index

Lieux : Genève, Suisse

Notions : Archives - Biographie - Presse - Seconde République

Personnes : Dameth, Henri - Pompéry (de), Edouard - Weill, Alexandre

Pour citer ce document

VUILLEUMIER Marc , « Some notes on the usefulness of biographical research for the study of the Fourierist movement  », Cahiers Charles Fourier , 2012 / n° 23 , en ligne : http://www.charlesfourier.fr/spip.php?article1105 (consulté le 9 juillet 2020).


Marc Vuilleumier

Marc VUILLEUMIER, ancien chargé d’enseignement à l’université de Genève, est spécialiste de l’histoire ouvrière. Il a participé au Dictionnaire biographique du mouvement ouvrier français dirigé par Jean Maitron. Il est également l’auteur de nombreux travaux sur le mouvement ouvrier en Suisse et sur les exilés politiques réfugiés dans ce pays


Les autres articles de Marc Vuilleumier





 . 

 . 

 .